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Showing posts from July, 2014

Electric Arduino Go-kart

Hello everyone! As the title says, I built an electric go kart which is powered by arduino! Here's a quick video to make you certain that this is the next thing you're going to build.
http://tinypic.com/player.php?v=w8x2s9&s=8
(Sorry, the embedding isn't working for some reason)
My background: I'm a 15 year old high school student from California. My hobbies include building stuff, reading, and studying Japanese.
I've also entered into the Epilog Challenge contest, please vote for me!
A quick disclaimer: I take no responsibility for any injuries to yourself or anyone else. Electricity is DANGEROUS. Chain drives are EVEN MORE DANGEROUS. They could easily cut a finger off or worse. Wear a helmet when attempting things like this.
With that out of the way :)
Overview:
The drive setup uses a Hobbywing Xerun 150A brushless electronic speed controller to control a Savox BSM5065 450Kv motor. Batteries are 3x zippy lithium polymer - 5 cells, 5000mah. The mot…

Make Your own Raspberry Pi Gameboy Replica

This “Gamegirl” 3D printed Gameboy replica by Adafruit features some seriously upgraded hardware to mark the original’s 25th anniversary. The Raspberry Pi processor allows it to run Gameboy, or even MAME ROMs, and the color touchscreen allows for much better graphics than the original’s grayscale display. Adding to these significant upgrades, the built-in rechargeable battery is a welcome addition. Those that had these devices likely remember buying battery after battery to keep playing Tetris or SolarStriker.
The case is 3D printed, and aside from the varied colors, it could be mistaken for an original Gameboy; at least it appears that way from the video. Aside from the printed parts, the gamepad buttons are recycled from a Super Nintendo controller, so there is some disassembly and cutting involved. Quite a few more components are also needed from Adafruit, but the instructions seem to lay everything out nicely.
If “merely” playing ROMs isn’t good enough for you, this…

PIE1 – Raspberry Pi Sends Live Images from Near Space

HAB (High Altitude Ballooning) is a growing hobby where enthusiasts use standard weather balloons to put small payloads typically 100g-1kg into “near space” at altitudes of around 30km or so, carrying a tracking device (so the balloon position is known throughout the flight) and usually some sensors (temperature, pressure etc) and often a video or stills camera storing to an SD card for later retrieval. The job of the tracker is to read the location from the GPS receiver, possibly also read some sensors, and then format and send a telemetry sentence to the ground over a low power radio link. Flights only happen once the predicted path is known to be safe (avoiding airports and densely populated areas for example) and permission has been gained from (in the UK) the CAA. Here the tracking system uses the 70cm radio band (around 434MHz) using RTTY to send the telemetry down to a number of ground stations run by other enthusiasts. Telemetry from all receivers is sent to a c…